2020ForumIssue3

Cutaneous Lymphoma Foundation FORUM 2020 Issue 3 What is the mSWAT? The mSWAT (Modified Severity-Weighted Assessment Tool) is one of several tools a health care provider uses to monitor active cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). CTCL research professionals most commonly use the mSWAT. If you participate in a clini- cal trial (also known as a research study), chances are your skin will be checked with this tool. “Tools” sound scary. Fortunately, the mSWAT, and several other assessment tools, only require a provider to look at your skin. A provider may use a tool to complete a visual exam before you even notice. Before the mSWAT, a dermatology team developed the original SWAT (Severity- Weighted Assessment Tool). The dermatol- ogy researchers collected 12 years of data on 323 individual patients over 1186 visits. The SWAT required an additional seven years of analysis before publication in 2002. In total, SWAT development took 20 years. To perform the SWAT, the provider inspected each individual patch, plaque, and tumor. Multipliers, also known as weighting factors, gave specific “weight” or “value” to each CTCL lesion type. Patches, which are flat, earned a multiplier of one. Plaques, which are raised, earned a multiplier of two. Tumors, which are larger and solid, earned a multiplier of three. Mathematically, a multi- plier of three (tumor) contributed to a higher SWAT score than a multiplier of one or two. The SWAT also utilized a technique known as grid-point counting. The provider used an overlay, or map, to count squares to determine each lesion’s size. Each indi- vidual patch size measurement was added with other patch measurements. Plaques and tumors underwent the same process. Next, each patch, plaque, and tumor total was multiplied by the applicable weighting factor. In the last step of the SWAT, the total in each of the three categories of lesions was added to obtain a final score. The SWAT result was a number that a provider monitored over time. A stable number suggested a stable condition. A lower number suggested less active CTCL and conversely, a higher number suggested more active CTCL. The “m” in mSWAT means “modified” or changed from the original. Today’s mSWAT increases the tumor weighting factor from a three to a four and eliminates the grid-point counting. Instead, the provider uses body What is the mSWAT? continued on page 9 Cutaneous Lymphoma Foundation From the President and the Chief Executive Officer............................ 3 Living with Cutaneous Lymphoma....................... 4 Supporting the Cutaneous Lymphoma Foundation Through Charitable Contributions....................................... 5 The Haystack Project .......................................... 6 Frequently Asked Questions.......................... 7 Annual AADA Legislative Conference Update........................................ 10 In Memory........................................................ 10 Medical Advisory Council Update.................. 11

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